Garstang CC skipper wants to cut out costly mistakes

Garstang skipper Mark Walling hits out on his way to 74 last weekend''                  Picture: Tim Gilbert/Preston Photographic Society
Garstang skipper Mark Walling hits out on his way to 74 last weekend'' Picture: Tim Gilbert/Preston Photographic Society

Garstang CC skipper Mark Walling hopes to have home rule this weekend when they meet Blackpool.

Garstang go into the game looking to atone for their defeat against Leyland last time out in the Northern League.

Having bowled out their opponents for 161, Garstang lost wickets at key times and were eventually all out for 159.

The captain was helpless as last man Alasdair Egerton was out, leaving Walling stranded on 74 not out.

Victory would have closed the gap on the top four as fifth-placed Garstang prepare to welcome title-cashing Blackpool who are second, 13 points behind Netherfield.

“That will be a really good game on Saturday,” Walling said.

“Blackpool have a young side who will be wanting to bounce back after losing at the weekend to Chorley.

“However, with our home form, we’ll be confident of getting 15 points as it has been impeccable this season apart from the one game against St Annes.”

If they are to claim victory on Saturday, then Garstang will have to avoid losing wickets at important times.

The Leyland defeat was a case in point as Walling contributed almost half his side’s runs.

Having seen a number of team-mates depart cheaply, he was given decent support from a couple of team-mates before they were dismissed as Leyland’s Henry Thompson followed up his knock of 46 with figures of 5-51.

“That was the frustrating part of it because we needed people to chip in,” Walling said.

“It was a hard wicket to bat on and 160 was a decent score but, when we came off, we felt fairly confident because it wasn’t an amazing score.

“We felt we could chase it down but the wicket was dry and the ball was spinning and bouncing.

“We kept losing wickets at crucial times and we talked afterwards about, to win games, someone needs to get a 50, a 60 or a 70 and then people have to contribute around them.

“We were just a bit unlucky in the end; sometimes you win those games and sometimes you lose.”