SAVE OUR HOSPICE: Niece thanks Lancaster St John’s Hospice for their amazing care after losing uncle a year ago

Lisa Preston, from Morecambe, niece of Terry Doc, with her husband, Robert and two twin boys, Alexander and Jacob.
Lisa Preston, from Morecambe, niece of Terry Doc, with her husband, Robert and two twin boys, Alexander and Jacob.

A woman who lost her uncle to cancer has praised the treatment he received from Lancaster’s St John’s Hospice shortly before he died last year.

Lisa Preston, 44, from Morecambe, has thanked the Slyne Road hospice for their “utterly amazing” service they provided for her uncle Terry O’Doherty who had larynx cancer (voice-box), bowel and lung cancer.

Morecambe man, Terry O Doherty who was a doorman for several years, died last February, 2013.

Morecambe man, Terry O Doherty who was a doorman for several years, died last February, 2013.

Terry was a well-known man in Morecambe and worked as a doorman and at Heysham Power Station for several years. He was known for his pub quiz knowledge and was a regular at Smokey O’Connor’s in Morecambe.

Terry fought his cancer battle for two years but sadly lost his life on February, 9, at the age of 64. The mum-of-three said: “It was devastating, he was a big character in Morecambe.

“Everybody knew him, there were hundreds of people at his funeral, which was nice, he would have been a bit embarrassed but he would have had a little smile about that.”

Lisa explains her uncle, who was like a father to her, was not the easiest patient during his two month stay at the hospice.

She said: “He was in and out of hospital, I was constantly by his side and then we got him a bed at the hospice and they were just amazing.

“He wasn’t the easiest patient but they were just angels.”

Lisa and her mum, Liz Cairns, were Terry’s main carers before the hospice came in to help the family.

She said: “It took such a massive strain of us having the support of the hospice, just somebody to help with the constant care. When you are caring for somebody who is dying and doesn’t want to die it’s hard.”

Lisa held a pub quiz last May at Smokey’s in memory of her uncle and was amazed by the local support.

The quiz night raised £3,000 for the hospice.

Lisa said: “When I organised the charity night, on May, 3, in a way it was sort of for selfish reasons because I couldn’t deal with the grief.

“I couldn’t face it, I couldn’t accept he had gone, I didn’t want to grieve, so I had to throw myself in.

“The local support from local shops was just amazing, every single person I asked said yes.”

Lisa, who works as an operations manager in Lancaster, explains her relationship with her uncle was always close.

She said: “We were really close, he was a good man.

“You would think the hospice is surrounded by so much death but it’s not like that at all.”