Roger Salmon column

Roger Salmon.
Roger Salmon.

Divorce can affect your pet by causing stress and behavioural problems.

These problems can manifest in several different ways such as chewing, barking, digging, soiling in the house, perhaps even snapping from nervousness they feel.

Any previous bad behaviour problem will most likely be exaggerated.

If you do not understand the problem and you get angry and yell at them matters can get worse.

The crying, arguing, loud noises affect them deeply making them feel frightened and insecure.

With the stress you are under and all the issues you must deal with, a valued member of your family can be neglected.

You are their world and they watch you closely and feel the tension and upset of the household.

You still provide the basic necessities, but you don’t realise divorce affects them too.

Be gentle with them and give them the extra attention they need.

At this time in your life you are pulled in different directions but you need peace and quiet, a place to think and your pet to talk to.

Cuddle your your pet, take advantage of the unconditional love they willingly provide.

Talk to them in quiet tones, they will be soothed by your voice.

If you are feeling low and rejected just look into their eyes and feel their love and you won’t feel as alone.

Rely on them, lean on them they won’t mind.

Nursing homes have tapped into the wealth of comfort that pets can give by having them visit residents on a regular basis.

You can see the joy in their eyes as they cuddle their furry visitor.

To help alleviate your stress, take your pet for a long walk to help them reduce the anxiousness they feel and help you to clear your head.

Whatever happens your pet will always love you unconditionally and be there for you.

Take advantage of the comfort they give to you.

Go through your situation together.

You will be amazed at the source of their support.