Lancaster schoolboy’s campaign recognised by Queen

Photo Neil Cross
Cameron Redpath who has cerebral palsy and has received a letter off the Queen for his campaign work for the disabled in the area
Photo Neil Cross Cameron Redpath who has cerebral palsy and has received a letter off the Queen for his campaign work for the disabled in the area

A teenager has been given royal approval for his campaign work for the disabled in Lancaster.

Cameron Redpath, who has cerebral palsy and is wheelchair bound, received a letter on behalf of the Queen for his five-month long campaign to improve disabled access.

Photo Neil Cross
Cameron Redpath who has cerebral palsy and has received a letter off the Queen for his campaign work for the disabled in the area

Photo Neil Cross Cameron Redpath who has cerebral palsy and has received a letter off the Queen for his campaign work for the disabled in the area

The 15-year-old is overwhelmed with support and now recognition from Her Majesty herself is the icing on the cake.

“I couldn’t quite believe it,” said Cameron, who attends Central Lancaster High School.

“I just sent off a campaign newsletter to the address at Buckingham Palace.

“When I got the letter I noticed the official emblem, I was shocked, I opened it carefully, it took me five minutes and I could feel the paper wasn’t just normal paper, it was posh.”

Photo Neil Cross
Cameron Redpath who has cerebral palsy and has received a letter off the Queen for his campaign work for the disabled in the area

Photo Neil Cross Cameron Redpath who has cerebral palsy and has received a letter off the Queen for his campaign work for the disabled in the area

The letter, signed by Lady Susan Hussey, lady-in-waiting to the Queen, informed Cameron that the Queen was pleased with his work in the community.

Since starting the campaign Cameron has successfully bid for dropped kerbs to be installed on the Ridge Estate in September to allow for easier access. Lancaster Bus Station has also been a location of attention for Cameron, as work takes place at one of the stands to allow minibuses to line up with the doorway for wheelchair users.

“We have to show people that being disabled isn’t going to stop us from doing day to day things, we are human like everybody else,” said Cameron.