How to watch the eclipse in the Lancaster district

Special glasses for watching the solar eclipse are particularly useful for schoolchildren.
Special glasses for watching the solar eclipse are particularly useful for schoolchildren.

Don’t forget to look out for the partial solar eclipse this morning, Friday.

Weather permitting, we should be able to see around 90 per cent of the sun covered as the moon crosses its path at 9.32am.

First contact is at 8.27am, with the eclipse ending at 10.41am.

Make sure you follow the guidelines to watch the event safely – and send us in your photographs of this rare occurence.

Dr Chris Arridge, a Royal Society research fellow and lecturer from Lancaster University’s physics department, suggests making a home-made ‘pinhole camera’ out of two sheets of paper if you don’t have any special eclipse glasses – or use a kitchen colander!

He said: “Some people say you can use sunglasses but you really shouldn’t. They block out the light glare but there are certain colours of light that still get through that can damage your eyes.

“You can buy special eclipse viewing goggles to provide complete protection but an easy way is to take a piece of paper and put a tiny hole in it with a needle.

“If you then hold that in front of the sun and allow the light that comes through the hole to fall onto another piece of paper held 2-3ft away you can then look at the second piece of paper to see a projected image of the sun with the moon crossing it.

“A colander does exactly the same thing if you hold it up to the sun and look at the piece of paper it projects the image onto.”