What happened to the trees?

The entrance to the West View car park off Victoria Street in Morecambe was lined with trees before they were removed.
The entrance to the West View car park off Victoria Street in Morecambe was lined with trees before they were removed.

Trees at the entrance to a car park in Morecambe have been cut down prompting a lively debate on social media.

The eight ‘self-seeded’ trees adorned the entrance to West View car park until recently, but Evelyn Archer, chair of the Friends of the Winter Gardens, only noticed they had gone when she drove past.

The entrance to the West View car park off Victoria Street in Morecambe after trees were removed.

The entrance to the West View car park off Victoria Street in Morecambe after trees were removed.

Evelyn said: “There was a car in front of me turning into the car park, and as I looked I thought’ flipping heck, the trees have gone! What a shame!

“I got a lovely photo of them last year. I didn’t know it had gone through planning.

“They have improved the entrance to the car park and it was long overdue but I just wondered why and who had given permission?”

Evelyn’s post about the trees on Facebook prompted a heated debate about the issue.

Ivan Harrison said: “It was also an ideal spot for storing stolen goods for later pick up, also used by drug takers away from prying eyes. I know 
because my home backed on to it.”

William James said: “It looks tidy, it revealed the mural on the end wall which was over grown, and the 
whole area of the car park has been improved. I live there and I appreciate it.”

Evelyn added: “They were lovely, I’m sad they have gone.”

A spokesman for Lancaster City Council said: “The eight sycamore trees were removed as part of a project to improve West View car park, 
which has been substantially refurbished.

“Due to the fact they were all self-seeded and not 
part of a formal planting scheme, they were also causing 
physical damage to an 
electricity substation and their removal helped to avoid potential structural damage 
to adjoining properties.

“In the interest of public amenity and to benefit wildlife, eight replacement trees have been planted in 
more suitable and sustainable locations.”