Drink in this exhibition of water

Thirlmere Aqueduct under construction in 1887. This amazing piece of engineering is still used today.
Thirlmere Aqueduct under construction in 1887. This amazing piece of engineering is still used today.

Across the North West an incredible 1,800m litres of water is used by us all each and every day.

Whenever we turn on the tap we all expect this precious liquid to come flowing out.

And yet most of us won’t even give a second thought about this most recognisable natural resource.

But this weekend, a special exhibition at the Storey in Lancaster will challenge our complacency when it comes to the drink of life.

The Museum of Water by artist Amy Sharrocks will be on show from February 6 to 8, then again from February 20 to 22.

The exhibition is a collection of publicly donated samples of water accompanied by the touching and personal stories of the people who donated them.

“We’re so used to being able to have water whenever we want it,” said Amy.

“We’re like an old married couple who take each other for granted and don’t give each other much thought because we’re always going to be there – and that is what the museum is trying to do – look at our feeling for water.”

United Utilities regional supplies manager John Butcher, who is responsible for transporting our region’s water through a network of aqueducts and pipes to millions of homes visited the exhibition in London last year.

“It will make everyone who visits consider how precious water is and what it means to us individually,” he said.

One of the donations has come from United Utilities’ Thirlmere Aqueduct, labelled the ‘Magic of Thirlmere’.

An amazing piece of engineering even today, the aqueduct was built by Victorian engineers almost by hand.

It takes water 83 miles from Cumbria to Manchester, supplying parts of Lancashire on the way, powered by gravity alone.

Entry to the museum at the The Storey is free. Call 01524 594 151 for opening hours.