John Halewood-Dodd column

John Halewood Dodd.
John Halewood Dodd.

I’m putting this together on the train returning from Glasgow following Tuesday’s superb victory over the Auld Enemy.

Yet again we adhered to the ‘Two Bar Rule’ whilst in Scotland which proved sensible as not all of the locals were as welcoming as they might have been.

The ‘Two Bar Rule,’ as we refer to it, is a longstanding rule which means that when we travel to support England we venture no further than the two bars which have been chosen as the preferred watering holes.

This has led to occasions where we miss out on some of the established sights of the various cities that we are visiting.

To some this makes us appear like Philistines as we are rarely found in the normal tourist traps.

I suppose it’s a matter of choice, but we would much prefer to be in good company, having a laugh, whilst taking a few beers, than having photos taken in front of local landmarks.

To be honest, do people really enjoy being forced to view pictures of their friends stood with inane grins in front of the Eiffel Tower or the Taj Mahal, for example?

From my own perspective I would suggest not.

It’s often too much like hard work trailing round cities that you’re unfamiliar with to view these sights and subsequently record them for posterity.

I am not alone in thinking that it’s much more fun to meet the locals whilst having a drink or two as the majority of my travelling companions are likeminded.

I recall traveling to Paris in the late 90’s and one of our party, Ian “Exy” Exley, had not previously visited the city of love.

After lengthy deliberations we decided to set aside the Sunday afternoon to take in the sights.

First on our list was Notre Dames and after trailing up the numerous steps to the cathedral, but before going in, Exy declared that he was knackered and needed a drink.

There was a bar directly in front of us and that’s where we stayed for the remainder of the afternoon.

He never got to see the many sights that Paris is famous for but we had a belting afternoon and still reminisce about it now.