Fitness Formation column

Ryan Donohue.
Ryan Donohue.
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I’m a sucker for certain products. I love them. The way they look. The way they feel.

I’m a snob for some of them. The sports company with the tick. Look at me when I’m working, and you would think I’m sponsored by them.

The tech company with the fruit logo.

I own a couple of their most successful products, and I preach about how great they are.

But the one thing I think they both do better than any of their competitors is marketing.

It’s slick. It’s cool. It’s straight to the point and catchy. It’s arguably the main reason they make billions of pounds. Clever marketing.

One other company has recently taken the world by storm with their most successful campaign ever.

The soft drink brand with the red and white can. Share a can with ‘Dave’. Share a can with ‘Sharon’. Cool. A can with my name on? How thoughtful of you.

I don’t know about you, but I certainly haven’t seen an increase in people sharing them.

I read an article recently whilst doing some research that I found very interesting.

In some countries they are marketed with the most popular children’s names, and in others, with names like mama and papa, which has generated criticism in to who exactly, are they marketing the product to.

With around 90 calories per can, and 25 grams of sugar, is this really the kind of marketing campaign we really want to be sucked in by?

Some companies spend £1 billion to £4 billion on marketing campaigns per year via all platforms.

The point is that in this day and age our choices are largely dependent on marketing, especially when it comes to food and drink.

You’ve seen an ad campaign, and it draws you to the nearest store, or website, and the industry is reaching out to us through all the various devices and means available to us. We live in a world saturated by marketing for fast food, and sugary drinks. They trigger our subconscious with ‘neuro-marketing’. We don’t even get off the couch to shop anymore.

How can you protect yourself from marketing that may be detrimental to your goals? Go back to basics. Visit your local supermarket.

Read the labels. Make your own, smart choices. Know what you are buying, and know the benefits to you.

Still want the can with your name on it?