Lancaster children learn about Somme 100 years on

Pupils from Moorside School in Lancaster took part in the Recommissioned project. Here they are pictured with Peter Donnelly, curator of the Kings Royal Regiment Museum. Photo by Darren Andrews.
Pupils from Moorside School in Lancaster took part in the Recommissioned project. Here they are pictured with Peter Donnelly, curator of the Kings Royal Regiment Museum. Photo by Darren Andrews.

Kids have learned all about the role of the King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment in a notorious First World War battle thanks to a £10,000 cash windfall.

The Friends of Lancaster City Museum received £10,000 from the Heritage Lottery Fund for a project presenting untold stories of the regiment at the Battle of the Somme.

Awarded through the Heritage Lottery Fund’s First World War: then and now programme, the Recommissioned project coincided with an exhibition at Lancaster City Museum called 141 Days: The Battle of The Somme.

As a result of the Recommissioned project, more people, especially the young, have learned about the history of the First World War through museum and heritage site visits, and talks.

A group of young people and community members working with a team of artists also created a sound and light promenade performance which attracted crowds of people during the Light Up Lancaster festival and was repeated on Armistice Day.

The performances at the museum were so popular that people were queuing to get in some had to be turned away.

Many people also attended a series of talks linked to this project at the Storey Centre.

The project culminated with a community history day and a World War One walking tour.

This was the first time that the Friends of Lancaster City Museum had applied to the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Roger Mace, chairman of the Friends, said he was “delighted” at the award.

“Recommissioned is an important development for the Friends as we look to step up our activities to ensure our local heritage is protected, celebrated and engages as many local people, especially the younger generation, in an accessible and imaginative way,” he said.

Light Up Lancaster saw thousands of visitors take to the streets after dark for a magical city-wide experience and light-art trail.

Using money raised through the National Lottery, the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) aims to make a lasting difference for heritage, people and communities across the UK. It has supported almost 35,000 projects with more than £5.5bn across the UK.