Georgian era in spotlight

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Two linked exhibitions at the Judges’ Lodgings Museum and Lancaster Maritime Museum explore how the wealthy families of Georgian Lancaster made – and spent – their fortunes.

The exhibitions cover many aspects of life among well-heeled Lancastrians of the period, from how they made their money through trade and marriage, to how they spent it on houses, portraits and fine clothes.

Hey Big Spender: Movers and Shakers in Georgian Lancaster is now on show at the Judges’ Lodgings and runs to November 2.

The exhibition features new objects, such as the portrait of a young boy pausing from playing ‘badminton’ and clothing from a local gentleman – Abram Seward – who was invited to meet King George III.

It also includes a group of exquisitely worked embroideries and samplers by children as young as eight or 10 years old, which are on display at the museum for the first time.

Additionally, the exhibition offers a special trail around the building with in-depth information about the permanent displays of Gillow furniture and fine art.

Money, Money, Money: Movers and Shakers in Georgian Lancaster opens at the Maritime Museum on Saturday April 27 and runs until November 2

The exhibition has been newly created and specially researched for the museum’s historic Custom House.

It features many objects not normally on display, including several fine portraits of Lancaster merchants and their families, together with the diary of merchant and slave trader Dodshon Foster.

Rachel Roberts, Lancashire County Council’s manager at the Maritime Museum, said: “The exhibitions are very family-friendly with plenty of things for people of all ages to see and do.”

Visitors to both venues will also have the chance to view rarely-seen portraits, many by prominent artists such as Lancashire’s George Romney.

Many portraits have come out of storage following extensive conservation work by Lancashire Conservation Studios.

Admission charges vary.

Full details and prices at www.lancashire.gov.uk/museums.