Morecambe Bay jet noise was ‘low flying training’

Air-to-air stills with RAF and French Air Force fast jets on exercise. A C130 Hercules aircraft will be used as a a platform to record RAF Typhoon (nearest the camera) flying with French Air Force Mirage 2000 jet. The facility is designed to promote Exercise Capable Eagle which runs at RAF Leeming from 7-18 October which is the Air Force part of Exercise Joint Warrior, one of the biggest military exercises in Europe. 
PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Sunday October 13, 2013. See PA story DEFENCE RAF. Photo credit should read: Lynne Cameron/PA Wire
Air-to-air stills with RAF and French Air Force fast jets on exercise. A C130 Hercules aircraft will be used as a a platform to record RAF Typhoon (nearest the camera) flying with French Air Force Mirage 2000 jet. The facility is designed to promote Exercise Capable Eagle which runs at RAF Leeming from 7-18 October which is the Air Force part of Exercise Joint Warrior, one of the biggest military exercises in Europe. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Sunday October 13, 2013. See PA story DEFENCE RAF. Photo credit should read: Lynne Cameron/PA Wire
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The sound of fighter jets over Morecambe Bay on Wednesday afternoon was likely to be an RAF training exercise.

The Ministry of Defence published details of Tactical Training Areas (TTA) for low flying training by fast jets and Hercules transport aircraft, which tally with what was heard on Wednesday June 8 at around 2.30pm.

People expressed their interest on social media after hearing the noise of aircraft over the bay.

The noise persisted for a number of minutes, with some saying they awoke to their house shaking.

Heavy cloud at the time reduced visibility.

The Ministry of Defence (MoD) said our requests for information were “too vague” but an online publication showed times for a TTA in the border areas of southern Scotland and northern England between 12pm and 3.30pm.

The document said: “Operational low flying by fixed wing aircraft between 250ft and 100ft is a more representative altitude at which pilots would actually fly in a combat scenario.

“The final decision to use a TTA is taken on the day itself as this kind of training can only take place when there is good visibility from cloud; while it is likely a number of the slots will not be used, no additional times will be added to those already booked.

“When a TTA is active, ‘routine’ low flying can take place down to 500 ft. When the TTA is not in use low flying training is permitted down to 250 ft and helicopters down to ground level. Late spring and summer are the busiest times for low flying as squadrons make full use of good weather to carry out their training.”