Pupils take to road to tackle speeding

PC Ian Nickson, the Local Community Beat Manager, pictured with pupils of St Luke's CE Primary School in Slyne-with-Hest after the speed education session.

PC Ian Nickson, the Local Community Beat Manager, pictured with pupils of St Luke's CE Primary School in Slyne-with-Hest after the speed education session.

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Children from Slyne-with-Hest have been helping to slow down speeding traffic near their school.

Pupils from St Luke’s CE Primary School joined forces with the police to speak to drivers breaking the 20mph speed limit on Hest Bank Lane.

The children monitored 208 vehicles which drove through the site with seven stopped for breaking the speed limit.

The highest recorded speed was 35mph.

PC Ian Nickson, local community beat manager, said: “This is another way of reinforcing the message that people should stick to 20mph.

“Speaking to the drivers makes them stop and think about how driving too fast could result in a child being killed or seriously injured.

“There have been positive comments with motorists telling us this type of scheme is likely to help them change the way they drive.

“The pupils also really enjoyed taking part.”

Records show that almost seven out of 10 accidents where people are either killed or seriously injured occur in 30mph areas. Of these, 79 per cent are either cyclists or on foot.

Schools Road Watch supports Lancashire County Council’s ongoing work to introduce 20mph speed limits in all main residential areas and outside schools.

This follows studies which show that rates of death and injury are lower for pedestrians hit by a vehicle at 20mph rather than 30mph.

County Coun Tim Ashton, cabinet member for highways and transport, said: “We want driving at 20mph in residential areas to become the norm, which will help to reduce casualties and make our streets safer, particularly for children who want to be able to play out or walk or cycle to school.

“No driver ever means to hit a child, but accidents do happen and you’re far less likely to kill or seriously injure someone at 20mph than 30mph.”