DCSIMG

Fully charged pupils win recycling award

Sarah Pass, commercial manager of Valpak Ltd, Janine Lund and Lancashire County Council waste management officer, with winning students from Thurnham Glasson CE Primary School.

Sarah Pass, commercial manager of Valpak Ltd, Janine Lund and Lancashire County Council waste management officer, with winning students from Thurnham Glasson CE Primary School.

Lancaster’s top recycling pupils are among youngsters from across the county to have won prizes for their schools by saving more than 16.5 tonnes of batteries from being landfilled.

442 schools took part in this year’s Tune into Battery Recycling competition, now in its ninth year, which encourages children to bring household batteries into school for recycling instead of throwing them away.

Lancashire County Council works in partnership with Valpak Ltd, who sponsor the contest.

The three primary schools in each district and the top-collecting high school in Lancashire won a prize.

The winners got to choose from an iPad (two for high school) or a £400 voucher for school supplies from TTS Group Ltd.

In the Lancaster area, Thurnham Glasson CE Primary School came out on top, followed by Leck St Peter’s CE School in second place and Steppings Stones School in third.

In the Wyre, area, Garstang Community Primary School came third.

And in the high school category, Garstang Community Academy in Wyre came third.

The prizes were presented by County Coun Janice Hanson, cabinet member for public protection and waste, at a ceremony held at the Environmental Education Centre at Farington Waste Recovery Park near Leyland.

She said: “Batteries contain heavy metals which become pollutants unless they’re removed from the waste stream.

“The methods used by our waste recovery parks at Farington and Thornton can take out a proportion of them but it’s better to recycle them before they get to that point.

“The battery recycling competition has proved a great success over many years. Every school which took part in this scheme has helped to make a difference – the 16.5 tonnes they’ve collected is the equivalent of a staggering 552,034 batteries. I’d particularly like to congratulate the winners for their exceptional efforts.”

The school rankings were calculated by dividing the total tonnage of batteries collected by the number of pupils in the school, which ensured that the success of the pupils, rather than the size of the school, was rewarded.

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page