Dog’s life saved after public support

Manager of Animal Care Diane Lambert (centre), assistant manager, Abi Sadler (right) and cattery manager, Gab Sadler, with Cheryl, a lercher which was saved by the public, who raised �1,000 to pay for an operation and after care for a broken leg.
Manager of Animal Care Diane Lambert (centre), assistant manager, Abi Sadler (right) and cattery manager, Gab Sadler, with Cheryl, a lercher which was saved by the public, who raised �1,000 to pay for an operation and after care for a broken leg.
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It wasn’t long ago that this lovable lurcher faced being put to sleep.

The adorable eight-month-old was found wandering the streets of Lancaster looking thoroughly down-at-heel.

A member of the public took the stray into Bay Vets Ltd in the city’s Bowerham Road, who diagnosed a badly broken front leg.

She was also underweight with her ribs showing.

But with no identity tag or any way of contacting her owners, the vets could not operate.

And with the small matter of £800 also being needed to cover the cost of the operation, the stray was potentially facing being put to sleep to end her misery.

Her fate looked doomed after a week went by and no-one came forward to claim her.

But then local charity Animal Care were alerted and staff quickly fell in love with the sandy blonde lurcher and her big brown eyes.

Abi Sadler, assistant manager for the charity, in Blea Tarn Road, Scotforth, picks up the story.

“She melted our hearts and we had to do something otherwise she would have been put down,” she said.

“She’s really really friendly and a big softy who just wants you to cuddle her all day.”

The team got to work and launched an urgent fundraising appeal for the dog nicknamed Cheryl, after Cherly Williams, the Bay Vets receptionist who had also taken a big shine to her.

The charity took to Facebook, its website and set up a Just Giving page, an online way of raising money for a good cause.

The public appeal asked givers to donate between £2 and £10. The charity was staggered by the response.

Within 12 hours it had raised over £920 - meaning Cheryl could be saved. Vet Colin Houston also managed to mend her broken leg with a metal plate and screws rather than amputate.

Mr Houston said: “The dog was very nice, placid and friendly which makes it really difficult.

“They are usually rehomed through Animal Care or the Dog Warden but it had a relatively nasty and costly injury and it really comes down to funding.

“We can’t do everything for free and it’s difficult for veterinary practices.”

Mr Houston said the issue could be simply solved by arranging for pets to be micro-chipped or a simple collar and tag.

Animal Care’s Abi said afterwards: “We are absolutely overwhelmed by the support given.

“We can’t believe how many people wanted to help - they have saved the dog’s life.” “Cheryl has had the operation and needs six weeks of kennel rest and then we will put her up for adoption.

“It’s all down to the public that she’s going to live.”