Chernobyl kids given warm Lancaster welcome

Chernobyl kids visit Lancaster as part of the Lune Valley Chernobyl Childrens Life Line.
Chernobyl kids visit Lancaster as part of the Lune Valley Chernobyl Childrens Life Line.

Families have welcomed children from Chernobyl to give them a break away from deprived conditions.

Six families from across the district have opened their homes for free to the children as they visit Lancaster.

Chernobyl kids visit Lancaster as part of the Lune Valley Chernobyl Childrens Life Line.

Chernobyl kids visit Lancaster as part of the Lune Valley Chernobyl Childrens Life Line.

Five children aged eight-years-old and a translator came to the country as part of the Chernobyl Children’s Life Line, set up in the Lune Valley.

“Their living conditions and environment are still impacted by the effects of nuclear fall-out in 1986 when reactor No.4 exploded at the Chernobyl power plant,” said Lune Valley Chernobyl Children’s Life Line a spokesman.

“They are visiting the area for a recuperative four-week stay to boost their immune systems and experience fresh air, nutritional food and basic health care.

“The children selected are from some of the most deprived economic areas, they lack basic medical supplies and often live in unsuitable housing for the minus 30 temperatures that are reached in winter months.”

Chernobyl kids visit Lancaster as part of the Lune Valley Chernobyl Childrens Life Line.

Chernobyl kids visit Lancaster as part of the Lune Valley Chernobyl Childrens Life Line.

The visit included free visits to various locations across Lancaster, Morecambe and the surrounding areas.

The fist week saw the group visit Tatham Fells School for the day, the Grand Theatre in Lancaster and a walk around Ingleton Waterfalls.

My Dentist In Lancaster and Specsavers Opticians checked the children’s health – only one child needed glasses but several fillings and teeth were removed among the children.

The second week saw the group visit Holgates Caravan park in Silverdale for a swim and bowling and a trip to Ingleborough Caves at Clapham where they experienced their first underground tour.

The third week started off with a splash at Greenlands Farm, where they were not only able to pet the animals but also have a play in the pop up pool and beach.

On Wednesday they had a slightly scary visit to Lancaster Castle when they all enthusiastically participated in a cell lock-in, in the dark.

The last week was more relaxed with a walk around Leighton Moss, a day in the Butterfly House and a tour around Williamson Park.

Then the finale included a day on the little train at Cinderbarrow Railway at Carnforth which was followed by a leaving party at one of the host families, Liz and Roger Neil’s house in Westhouse.

“It was a fun if not tiring month, but lots of fun enjoyed by all and the change in the children was abundant,” added a Lune Valley Chernobyl Children’s Life Line a spokesman.

“For us to continue to help these children we need continued support.

“We would be grateful for donations, offers of fundraising (it costs on average £600 per child to visit the 
country), support and help at the activities we hold, clothing and suitcase donations (good quality please) and lastly more 
passionate committee members to join our team.”

For more information please see the Facebook page at Lune Valley Chernobyl Children’s Life Line or 
alternatively you can email katherinebeaumont76@gmail.com.