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Fair price for milk

Claire and Richard Barber from Manor Farm in Garstang

Claire and Richard Barber from Manor Farm in Garstang

Farmers in Wyre, North Yorkshire and South Cumbria have commended a retailer’s drive to pay the highest supermarket price for milk.

Booths have launched a new fair milk product, which will replace all Booths own label milk, paying the highest supermarket price of 35.5p per litre to farmers.

Chairman Edwin Booth said: “As dairy farmers are under pressure, we guarantee to pay our farmers the highest market price for every pint of milk we sell.

“Paying the highest market price means family farms are able to keep going, invest in the future and spend more time and money looking after their herds to ensure they produce great quality milk.”

One family farm in each of Booths counties will benefit; these are Manor House Farm in Garstang, Wigglesworth Hall Farm in Wigglesworth, Heaves Farm in Kendal and Lower Lightwood Green Farm, Nr Crewe.

Claire and Richard Barber of Manor House Farm in Garstang said: “It is an honour for us here at the High Hopes Herd to supply our milk to Booths. We share many values as a family business with a sustainable outlook and we sell the best produce we can from the cows we care passionately about. The Booths milk price will allow our business to invest and move forward to the next step confidently.”

Roger Mason from Heaves Farm in Levens, Cumbria, said; “As a long established family dairy farm, we at Heaves Farm are proud to be working together with Booths to promote a great quality local product. The opportunity to receive a high farmgate, long term, sustainable milk price bodes well for us and other local farmers giving us the confidence to invest and ensure a viable future both for ourselves and the next generation.”

The market price is collected by an independent price comparison consultancy, milkprices.com, who monitor the farmgate prices of the major UK supermarkets. Booths said it would review the market price regularly, to ensure it was paying farmers more than their supermarket rivals.

 

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